Anatomy of a Pin (2016)

Their enticing sharpness allows pins to pierce through materials, including our skin. As straight lines they are capable of amplifying the movement of a surface they’re connected to, and collectively they accumulate into a soft manoeuvreable fur. With a hole on one end they can pull a soft line of thread through other materials, holding these together to construct three-dimensional forms. Being made of metal they are able to conduct electricity, and can be used to close a circuit to detect touch. As simple and commonly known tools they are transparent and familiar, and we use them to manipulate our world.

>> Anatomy of a Pin Instructables Collection
>> Flickr Collection


>> http://www.plusea.at/?category_name=anatomy-of-a-pin
>> http://www.plusea.at/?p=5774
>> http://www.instructables.com/id/Anatomy-of-a-Pin/

SITUATED KNOWLEDGES MACHINES – ISSUE 2

I’ve been thinking about the straight pins that tailors use in dressmaking to pin fabrics together. They’re so reduced to their elements. There’s one end that’s intended for us to interact with and that’s the head, where we won’t poke ourselves. Then there’s the sharp end that we’re not going to interact with and that’s going to be interacting with the material. And then there’s the shaft in between, which is the distance between us and the material, which is kind of a tool.
>> http://situated.systems/knowledges/02/situatedsystems_zine02_screen.pdf

Dangerous Fur

A wearable opportunity for dangerous engagements with a very safe world.
Our bodies evolved over millions of years to survive an environment shaped by natural forces. We’ve used our bodies to modify this environment, building tools, technology, infrastructure and community to overcome the dangers that threatened our survival. Today our bodies survive the dangers of the built environment we’ve created.

>> http://www.plusea.at/?p=5791
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/plusea/sets/72157666161511975



Sharpness?

What makes something sharp != What makes something dangerous

The Science and Engineering of Cutting: The Mechanics and Processes of Cutting
Sharpness and Bluntness Absolute or Relative? Tool Materials and Tool Wear

Its about force multiplication. The thinner the edge, the more the focused the force, and the higher the pressure. At enough pressure, a material will give way. A wedge shape can both multiple the force and drive the material apart, further cutting it. A duller knife has a thicker end, and hence requires more force.
>> https://www.quora.com/What-makes-an-object-sharp-enough-to-cut-Why-can-regular-paper-cut-you-but-not-cardboard


DANGER / OK TO TOUCH

Danger is not something external to ourselves that we can eradicate from our lives.

A pin is a device used for fastening objects or material together. Pins often have two components: a long body and sharp tip made of steel, or occasionally copper or brass, and a larger head often made of plastic. The sharpened body penetrates the material, while the larger head provides a driving surface. It is formed by drawing out a thin wire, sharpening the tip, and adding a head. Nails are related, but are typically larger. In machines and engineering, pins are commonly used as pivots, hinges, shafts, jigs, and fixtures to locate or hold parts. Pins hurt.
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pin

Dangerous Lashes

Flesh-like silicone tube pierced by 28 dress pins becomes a mesmerizing display of dangerous lashes. The gear shafts and the box housing them are all held together by sewing.
>> http://www.instructables.com/id/Dangerous-Lashes/
>> Instructable
>> Flickr set

Maneuverable Fur

Many lines penetrating two planes. Displacing the planes through shifting and twisting them causes the lines to move like fur. The lines are straight pins, they are poked through two layers of fabric which are stretched on two separate frames.
>> http://www.instructables.com/id/Maneuverable-Fur/
>> Instructable
>> Flickr set


The Pin Factory


An 18th Century Pin Factory from the Encyclopédie edited by Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d’Alembert, 1751–72.
>> http://platypus1917.org/2013/11/01/adam-smith-revolutionary/

In the first sentence of An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776), Adam Smith foresaw the essence of industrialism by determining that division of labour represents a quantitative increase in productivity. Like du Monceau, his example was the making of pins.
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Division_of_labour

Book I, Chapter 1. Of the Division of Labor: THE greatest improvement in the productive powers of labor, and the greater part of the skill, dexterity, and judgment with which it is anywhere directed, or applied, seem to have been the effects of the division of labor….To take an example, therefore, the trade of the pin-maker;
>> http://sourcebooks.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/adamsmith-summary.asp

Adam Smith’s pin factory example is an application of his theory of division of labour. Smith argued that humans can ‘specialize’ their skills in order to create greater aggregate human prosperity. The pin factory is a specific example of how labourers can specialize within even menial tasks such as pin manufacturing in order to increase productivity.
>> https://www.quora.com/What-is-so-important-about-Adam-Smiths-pin-factory-example

Adam Smith’s Wealth Of Nations reference to pin making overshadowed the broader significance of this “trifling manufacture”, which had been “very often taken notice of”. Paucelle (2007) traced Smith’s sources to Diderot and d’Alembert’s Encyclopedie (1755), Duhamel’s Arts & Metiers (1761), and Macquer’s Dictionnaire portatif (1766), all detailing the long-established manufacture of L’Epingles (Pins). Smith used these details to illustrate the direct association of the division of labour with sustained increases in productivity, leading to the wider consumption of the “necessaries and conveniences of life”, and, we now know, to unprecedented living standards in market societies.
>> https://www.adamsmith.org/blog/economics/of-pins-and-things

One man draws out the wire, another straightens it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving, the head; to make the head requires two or three distinct operations; to put it on is a peculiar business, to whiten the pins is another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into the paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which, in some factories, are all performed by distinct hands, though in others the same man will sometimes perform two or three of them.

In traditional manufacture, with each man performing all the steps, they would be hard pressed to produce 20 in a day. As described by Smith, the task of making a pin was broken down to eighteen distinct operations, which were all performed by distinct hands. Smith goes on to point out that he had observed small factories of some 10 men who, engaged in the detailed division of labor, could produce some 48,000 pins a day. This would amount to some 4,800 pins for each man, a significant increase in productivity.
>> http://www.faculty.rsu.edu/users/f/felwell/www/Theorists/Essays/Braverman1.htm


How It’s Made – Needles & Pins


Others Works

Mona Hatoum’s Pin Carpet

>> http://www.fabricworkshopandmuseum.org/Artists
>> https://www.icaboston.org/art/mona-hatoum/pin-rug
/ArtistDetail.aspx?ArtistId=20816cd7-3ae0-4c7d-9f89-d099ca2f6e94

Bart Hess Metal Fur

During milan design week 2014 dutch fashion / material designer bart hess is presenting a sequel to the installation ‘work with me people’ by MU during dutch design week 2012. for this occasion, hess installed a sweatshop-like intervention where dozens of visitors work on the various textiles for products that are distributed among bart’s international clientele. ‘work with me people’ refers to the discrepancy between, on the one hand, the post-fordian creative industry, and on the other the huge amount of work required to sustain it. the innovative format of the project offers insight into the production process of the couture textiles by hess and invites visitors to take part in making them.
>> http://www.designboom.com/design/bart-hess-work-with-me-people-04-15-2014/
>> https://vimeo.com/82293548
>> http://barthess.nl/wwmp.html


Susie MacMurray’s Widdow and Wax and Pins

>> http://www.susie-macmurray.co.uk/images/garment-sculptures/widow
>> http://www.susie-macmurray.co.uk/images/sculptures/wax-and-pins